The Chemistry Blog

Chemical uses, chemistry information and industry news

Chemistry GCSE Revision: Atomic Structure And The Periodic Table

Among the fundamental concepts in GCSE chemistry that you should revise is the atomic structure and the arrangement of elements in the periodic table. This article will provide some guidelines and tips on how to effectively understand this important topic in preparation for your GCSE exam. Links to external sources are provided for more in-depth revision. Atoms, Elements And Compounds All...

Ethanoic Acid Uses In Everyday Life

Ethanoic acid is the active component of vinegar, and is also known as acetic acid. It’s the most important type of carboxylic acid because of its many practical uses, which range from culinary applications to industrial processes. Ethanoic acid can be produced through the fermentation process and oxidation of carbohydrates, like the sugars from coconut juice.  What Are The Uses...

Why Do Chemistry GCSE As A Single Science?

If you’re planning to study chemistry at ‘A’ Level, then you’ll need to have passed at least five GCSEs, and one of these should be in chemistry. If you’ve thought one step further, and are planning to pursue a specialised career in chemistry, taking Double Science (physics, chemistry and biology) at GCSE may not be the best option for...

What’s The Difference Between GCSE Chemistry Single Science And Combined Sciences?

With the different science GCSEs available, choosing the right one can feel daunting. If you want to gain a broad understanding of biology, chemistry, and physics, a GCSE in Combined Sciences is probably the best path for you. If you already know which scientific discipline you’d like to pursue, then a single science GCSE, like chemistry, will give you...

About the Chemistry Blog

At the Chemistry Blog, we want to inform and educate people about chemistry, the chemical industry, and the uses, benefits, and applications of chemicals. You'll find plenty of chemical information here, from how to remove sticky labels with rubbing alcohol to the differences between distilled and deionised water.