The Chemistry Blog

Chemical uses, chemistry information and industry news

The Science Behind Hydrochloric Acid

Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is a naturally occuring acid that’s produced in the stomachs of mammals to aid digestion. In humans, it’s found in the gastric juice, a.k.a. stomach acid, where it helps to break down food. But HCl is also produced industrially by dissolving gaseous hydrogen chlorine in water. As a corrosive and acidic solution, hydrochloric acid has several...

Chemistry GCSE Revision: Organic Chemistry

Organic chemistry is one of the most difficult science subjects - one that even science majors find challenging. If you’re in secondary school and preparing for your GCSE in science, you probably know what we’re talking about.  Not only does organic chemistry involve understanding complex concepts and memorising molecular structures, you’ll also need to learn the standard nomenclature system and...

Does Titanium Dioxide Have Health Benefits?

Titanium dioxide is a natural mineral oxide of titanium with the chemical formula TiO2. It’s commonly used as a pigment in a wide range of products, from paint and ceramics to beauty products. It’s even used in food, particularly cake decorations, where it’s recognised by the E-number E171. But does this substance actually have any health benefits? The Health Benefits...

Chemistry GCSE Revision: The Rate and Extent of Chemical Change

Chemical reactions can be fast or slow - just think about the difference between exploding dynamite and a rusting iron gate. What’s the main difference? The rate of chemical change. One happens in a split second while the other can take decades before it’s fully completed.  Another main difference is the extent of chemical reaction, meaning how much of the...

About the Chemistry Blog

At the Chemistry Blog, we want to inform and educate people about chemistry, the chemical industry, and the uses, benefits, and applications of chemicals. You'll find plenty of chemical information here, from how to remove sticky labels with rubbing alcohol to the differences between distilled and deionised water.